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Essential herbs and spices for a healthy lifestyle.

Caraway Spice for Bloating

Caraway Spice for Bloating

A Caraway aperitif is both tasty and curative.

caraway spice

Caraway spice is helpful to relieve bloating, flatulence and an upset stomach.

Caraway seeds has been a valued household staple for at least 7,000 years. Native to the Middle East and Europe and cultivated today in North America, this aromatic spice is a member of the carrot, or Apiaceae, family. Every part of caraway — from its roots to its feathery leaves — is edible, although the seeds and oil are most often prescribed for medicinal purposes. Caraway seeds help promote digestion, relieve intestinal cramps and pain, stimulate the appetite and expel excess gas. When thee seeds are steam-distilled, they produce a volatile oil that possesses notable anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties. It, too, is used to treat bloating and colic. Mildly spicy and fragrant, the seeds are also a popular flavoring in Austrian cooking and can be found in breads, cakes and pastries. The oil is used to flavor such digestive liqueurs as aquavit.


Recipe for caraway aperitif

Grind 1 ¾ oz. of caraway seeds in a mortar and put the ground spice in a clean, glass bottle. Pour in 3 cups of 80-proof vodka and steep, sealed, for 10 days. shake the bottle at regular intervals. Pour the blend through a filter, and then bottle and cap tightly. To take, put 2 tbsp. in a cup of water and drink it before mealtimes. store the aperitif in the refrigerator.


Caraway (Carum carvi) Therapeutic Effect: Caraway is both carminative (Gas-releasing) and antispasmodic; as such, it`s a reliable remedy for all types of bloating, colic, cramping and flatulence. In addition, the seeds have expectorant properties and are useful in treating bronchitis. Recent research indicates that caraway tea may also play a key role in preventing or treating iron-deficiency anemia by notably increasing intestinal iron absorption.

Components

The most important component in caraway is the digestion-promoting essential oil, which is primarily made up of dihydrocarvone, carvone, carveol, polysaccharides and limonene. The seeds also contain resin, proteins, flavonoids, pigments, carbohydrates and tannins.

For bad breath

The limonene content of caraway seeds is said to contain breath-freshening qualities. Chewing the fresh seeds is an effective and natural means of combatting bad breath. Discard the seeds once they lose their flavor.


Caraway Kitchen Hints

Store both the dried and ground spice in airtight containers and keep away from the light. Caraway should keep for 2 years; after that it looses both its flavor and health promoting benefits.

Caraway’s fresh and feathery leaves have a mild flavor and can be added to salads. Store them briefly in plastic bags in the refrigerator. Its taproot, too, can be boiled or baked and eaten as a vegetable. Store in the same way.

If you want the flavor of caraway without using the whole seeds, grind the seeds in a coffee-bean grinder. To prevent the essential oil from escaping during grinding, chill the seeds in a freezer at least 1 hr. before grinding.

Caraway becomes bitter if cooked for a long time. For full flavor and medicinal benefits, add fresh reeds during the final 15 min. of cooking. Add the ground spice during the final 45 min. of cooking.

Caraway spice adds a tasty pungency to marinated salads, especially potato salad, cole slaws, soups and pickles. To imitate the flavor of a barrel-cured pickle, add 1 tsp. of whole caraway seeds to a quart jar of sour pickles and let stand for at least 24 hr. before eating.

Caraway Seed

Caraway Spice, which comes from the plant known by the botanical name of Carum carvi, is used in a wide variety of culinary dishes as well as personal care products and for health. Caraway Seed, which is actually the fruit produced by the flower of the Carum plant, is used to add an anise-like flavor to several different foods. You will find this spice as a seasoning in Rye breads, for example. It is also used to flavor sauerkraut, Akvavit liquor, havarti cheese and others. The distinctive aroma from the Caraway Spice is also used in main dishes found in Central and Northern European cuisines. It may also be found to have astringent qualities. The distinctive caraway seed has also been used to scent soaps and body lotions.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
All information provided in this site is the result of research using (but not limited to) the following books and guides: The Complete Guide to Natural Healing, International Masters Publishers.
This site makes every effort to provide accurate and up-to-date information that is intended to complement, not replace, the advice of your physician. Before undertaking the advice contained on this web site, you should consult with a health care professional, who can best assess your individual needs, symptoms and treatment.

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Horseradish Health Remedy

Horseradish Health Remedy

Horseradish, frequently found in the wild, has long been treasures as a spice, a health remedy and a food.

horseradish health remedy

The root originated in southeastern Europe and has been used in central Europe since the twelfth century. At one time, cookbooks contained many recipes for everyday dishes using fresh horseradish, and it was heavily relied on as a health remedy. Because of its high mineral and vitamin-C content, horseradish was once used to combat scurvy, which is caused by vitamin-C deficiency. The plain-looking root also stimulates appetite and digestion. The mustard oils in fresh horseradish are what clears your sinuses quickly, even when you eat a small amount. Daily use may help to decrease hay fever allergy symptoms as well; take until symptoms decrease and then once a month as needed.

One of the many horseradish health benefits is that it promotes digestion. Fresh grated horseradish stimulates the digestive glands and the mucous membranes of the stomach and intestine. It increases gastric juice production, regulates elimination, helps expel worms and brings intestinal activity back to normal. Eat some daily by adding grated root to your yogurt, salad dressings or meats.


Horseradish Therapeutic Effect:

The mustard oils in horseradish inhibit the growth of bacteria and viruses, so its useful for treating respiratory, intestinal and urinary-tract infections. Because it promotes blood flow, it can also serve as an antiseptic diuretic for kidney and bladder complaints, induce a sweat and help battle fatigue.

Components

Horseradish root contains antibacterial mustard glycosides, particularly sinigrin, which is broken down into mustard oil when the root is crushed. Along with the essential oils, the glycosides are responsible for the hot spiciness of the root. The horseradish root is also very rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and the minerals potassium, calcium, iron and phosphorus. You can meet the adult minimum daily requirement of 75 milligrams of vitamin C with 70 grams of horseradish.


More about Horseradish as a Health Remedy

Horseradish juice, promotes expectoration. If your cough is accompanied by a sore throat, mix 1 tsp. of the grated root in a glass of water with a little honey, and gargle.


Horseradish Kitchen Hints

Fresh horseradish roots are solid and juicy. Don’t choose elastic or even soft roots; they are too old.

To store horseradish roots, wrap them in paper and keep them in the vegetable drawer of your refrigerator. They will stay fresh for several weeks.

Horseradish roots can be frozen, but clean them before freezing. Whenever you need some horseradish, grate directly from the frozen root. With a lower temperature, evaporation of the essential oils will be reduced, eliminating eye irritation.

Sulfur dioxide is often added to prevent discoloration in pre-grated horseradish sold commercially. Check the product label for unsulfured horseradish.

To prevent discoloration, mix fresh-grated horseradish with lemon juice or vinegar; cover.

You can grate small amounts of horseradish on a kitchen grater, but for larger roots you’ll want to use a food processor. To protect your tear ducts, grate horseradish in a well-ventilated area or, if possible, outside.

Do not cook horseradish, or it will turn bitter. cooking destroys its health-giving properties.

Horseradish Powder

For a piquant taste that will liven up nearly any savory recipe, it would be hard to beat Horseradish Powder. The commonly edible part of the Horseradish spice is the root. Horseradish spice is a common addition to many condiments you likely have in your kitchen right now. It can be added to mustard or to mayonnaise to make a sparkling addition to your next grilled hamburger or sausage. It also makes a tasty addition to thousand island dressing, which can then be applied to a variety of sandwiches. Horseradish spice is a wonderful ingredient to use in the preparation of Cesar salad or green goddess dressings as well. It can also be added to sour cream and used as an accompaniment to roasted meats such as beef or port roasts. It makes a tasty addition to coleslaws made from shredded cabbage as well. Horseradish can also be added in small amounts to barbecue sauce to spice it up. Horseradish Powder tastes great when added to tomato-based cocktail sauces used for garnishing shrimp and other seafood.

In addition to culinary uses, our Horseradish Powder is commonly used as a stimulant.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
All information provided in this site is the result of research using (but not limited to) the following books and guides: The Complete Guide to Natural Healing, International Masters Publishers.
This site makes every effort to provide accurate and up-to-date information that is intended to complement, not replace, the advice of your physician. Before undertaking the advice contained on this web site, you should consult with a health care professional, who can best assess your individual needs, symptoms and treatment.

 

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Chives healing properties

Chives healing properties

Usefulness of Chive Flowers.

chives healing properties

The chive’s delicate purple flowers have a milder flavor than the leaves and add a decorative touch to salads, herb oils and other dishes. Add chives healing properties to your diet by making  chive-flower oil. Add 1 ½ oz. of the blossoms to 1 quart of vegetable oil. After a week, the oil will turn lilac and take on the fragrance of the chive flowers. Use the oil on salads or in cooking — keep it refrigerated when not in use.

A part of the same botanical family as onions, scallions and garlic, chives grow from small bulbs and have a long history of medicinal and culinary uses. In the Middle Ages, Chives healing properties were promoted as a cure for melancholy and believed to drive away evil spirits. Today, we know that chives and chive flowers are high in vitamin C, folic acid and potassium. Therefore, they should be routinely added to recipes to help restore vital nutrients lost in cooking.

This herb’s tangy, aromatic taste comes from its high concentration of sulfur compounds and other essential oils, which are also partly responsible for its healing properties. Chives healing properties ease stomach distress, protect against heart disease and stroke and may help the body fight bacteria that can cause disease. In addition, the herb may increase the body’s ability to digest fat.


Chives Therapeutic Effect:

The medicinal properties of chives are as varied as their uses in the kitchen. Chives stimulate the appetite and promote good digestion. They can be used to ease stomach upset, clear a stuffy nose, reduce flatulence and prevent bad breath. Combined with a low-salt diet, they help lower high blood pressure. Plus, they have a mild diuretic effect, as well as some antibacterial properties.

Components

Chives are valued for their many essential minerals, including cardiac-friendly potassium, bone-strengthening calcium and blood-building iron. And unlike most other members of the onion family, chives are high in folic acid (a B vitamin), vitamin A and vitamin C. In fact, just 3 ½ oz. of chives supplies enough vitamin C to meet tour daily requirement of 60 mg.


EXTRA TIP

If you like the oniony flavor of chives, make your own chive salt to add zip to all sorts of dishes. First, add some chives to some sea salt. Then bake the mixture in the oven to dry the leaves and blend the flavors. Bake at 200° for about ¾ hour. Store in an airtight jar.


Kitchen Hints for Chives

Cut chives just before you are ready to use them to preserve their vitamins, aroma and flavor. Chives are delicate; to prevent the loss of essential oils, snip them with kitchen shears rather than chopping or grinding them.

Don’t heat chives or they will lose their valuable vitamin C as well as their digestive properties.

Grow chives at home in a pot or the windowsill. Wait until the plant reaches about 6 inches in height before harvesting. Harvest the chive leaves frequently to prevent blooming unless you specifically want to use the flowers. Once the plant blooms, the leaves become much less flavorful.

Freeze chives for future use. Frozen chives tend to retain more flavor than dried chives. Snip fresh chives into small pieces, then place them in an ice-cube tray and fill with water. To thaw, put a chive cube in a strainer.

What would an ordinary baked potato be without a generous helping of Chives sprinkled on top? In addition to potato recipes, Chives can be used in a variety of savory dishes. Our Chives come to us directly from our supplier in Taiwan, and then are processed in house to bring you the finest quality dried Chives.The botanical name for this fabulous Chive herb is (Allium schoenoprasum,) and like other Alliums, the plant has an onion-like flavor and scent. Pan-fried or grilled fish, in addition to smoked salmon or tilapia, can have a jolt of taste added by the simple addition of a butter sauce to which the herb has been added. It can be added to biscuit batter for a piquant flavor. Chicken benefits from this zesty herb as well, as does a fresh tomato salad with a veined blue cheese. Tartar sauce sings when this onion relative is added, as do chickpea salads.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
All information provided in this site is the result of research using (but not limited to) the following books and guides: The Complete Guide to Natural Healing, International Masters Publishers.
This site makes every effort to provide accurate and up-to-date information that is intended to complement, not replace, the advice of your physician. Before undertaking the advice contained on this web site, you should consult with a health care professional, who can best assess your individual needs, symptoms and treatment.

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Health Benefits of Cayenne Pepper

Health Benefits of Cayenne Pepper

The Health Benefits of Cayenne Pepper were not always recognized.

When Columbus brought peppers back to Europe, they were popular as ornamental plants. Their medicinal effects were not discovered by the Old World until later, and for a long time medical practitioners still warned against eating cayenne pepper.

They typically chose to apply it only externally to stimulate circulation in the skin and soothe symptoms of sciatica or rheumatism.

Today, many naturopaths use cayenne pepper to stimulate digestion and the circulatory system.


Therapeutic Effect: Cayenne is a potent stimulant for the whole body and is especially useful for aiding digestion, normalizing circulation, toning the nervous system and relieving pain and inflammation. The capsaicin contained in the peppers promotes the secretion of important digestive enzymes; formation of saliva increases tenfold! Cayenne is often blended with other herbs to enhance their medicinal action.

Components

Cayenne contains a great deal of vitamin C and beta-carotene, which is converted into vitamin A in the body and is important to eyesight. In terms of the healing arts, the pepper’s most important component is capsaicin, an alkaloid. Cayenne pepper also contains essential oils , which are responsible for stimulating the skin, as well as for the spice’s appetizing color and aroma. Therapeutically, use uncooked cayenne, either fresh or dries, because it is less irritating than cooked cayenne pepper.


EXTRA TIP

To ease arthritic joints with heat, mix 3 tbsp. of white flour with 1 tsp. of olive oil and 1 tsp. ground cayenne pepper. Add water to make a paste. Layer a piece of cloth, the plaster and another piece of cloth on the skin. Leave on until the skin reddens and feels quite warm.


Help for Fever

The Indians in Central and South America use cayenne pepper in a spicy tea to help combat fever and colds. Add a pinch of cayenne pepper to 1 cup of prepared herbal tea (chamomile or fennel) and stir briskly. rink as hat as possible, and follow with bed rest. The stimulating, sweat-inducing effect of the cayenne pepper will help the fever to battle toxins.


Help for your heart

I am glad I found out that I can get Cayenne pepper in capsule form, rather than the powder that I had been taking. Cayenne Pepper Capsules are so convenient.


Cayenne Pepper Kitchen Hints

Cayenne pepper goes with meat sauces, goulash, fish, shellfish and woups and vegetable dishes.

Because cayenne is such a hot pepper, it should be simmered for quite a while, allowing it time to blend with the other flavors. The heat resides mainly in the little white seeds and in the robs inside the pepper. Use the whole pepper to make a fiery dish, but for a milder result, remove its insides.

When cleaning the peppers, be sure not to touch your eyes or any mucous membranes, as severe burns could result; use gloves.

If you cook something too spicy, make it milder by adding coconut milk, noodles or  potatoes.

A burning mouth need not be the result of eating cayenne peppers. Try munching on a slice of bread, some coconut or a bit of salt to reduce the sting. Grabbing a cold drink, such as mineral water or juice, will not help.

The cayenne pepper spice contains primarily dried, ground chili peppers. Chili powder contains other spices and additives. Very spicy “hot” sauce is made of chili peppers, vinegar and salt.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
All information provided in this site is the result of research using (but not limited to) the following books and guides: The Complete Guide to Natural Healing, International Masters Publishers.
This site makes every effort to provide accurate and up-to-date information that is intended to complement, not replace, the advice of your physician. Before undertaking the advice contained on this web site, you should consult with a health care professional, who can best assess your individual needs, symptoms and treatment.

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Garlic Healing Properties

Garlic Healing Properties

Garlic Help for Colds

garlic healing propertiesFor more than 5,000 years, garlic has been valued for its healing properties and its ability to increase the body’s strength and energy.

Fresh garlic mixed with honey is an effective home remedy for colds, hoarseness and inflammation of the throat.

Use a garlic press or mini food processor to crush 1 oz. of fresh garlic cloves. Mix the crushed garlic with 2 cup of honey. Let the mixture sit for 1 hour to infuse the honey with the garlic’s essential oils. Store in a cool place. At the first sign of a cold, take 1 – 2 tsp. of the mixture and then repeat every hour thereafter. Also, should the cold get worse, this remedy can be effective for relieving severe chest congestion and painful coughing.

The builders of the three great pyramids at Giza in Egypt are said to have eaten garlic to rejuvenate their bodies after their back-breaking work.

Today, garlic is thought to help prevent heart disease, stroke and hypertension. In addition, its essential oils and other components have strong antibiotic, anti fungal and antiviral properties.

Garlic can also be made into a salve to help ease neuralgia, joint pain, sprains, corns and other skin afflictions.

Getting the medicinal benefits of garlic is easy, because it makes a delicious seasoning for so many foods.


Therapeutic Effect: The sulfur Found in garlic’s essential oils makes it a potent disinfectant and a good defense for killing germs in the body. After garlic is ingested, it is absorbed into the blood stream and then diffused through various organs. In this way, the skin, intestines, lungs and urinary system all profit from the highly effective healing properties of the garlic.

Components

Garlic is rich in essential oils, whose principle active agent is allicin. This compound is responsible for the characteristic odor of garlic, as well as many of its healing properties. In addition, garlic contains calcium, selenium, potassium and zinc.

Fighting heart disease and stroke

Garlic lowers LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels and raises HDL (“good”) cholesterol, thus helping to prevent the buildup of plaque within the coronary arteries. It also helps keep blood clots from forming in the blood vessels. Both actions protect against heart attack and stroke.


Kitchen Hints

When buying garlic, choose solid firm bulbs. The outer skin should be taut, unbroken and white or violet in color. Avoid bulbs with soft or damp spots.

Store garlic in a cool, dry place; it will keep for several weeks. A ceramic garlic keeper is best for storage because it lets air circulate.

Braided strands of garlic may look attractive, but unfortunately most of the bulbs are likely to spoil before you get around to using them.

Garlic looses its antibacterial effect when it is cooked or aged for more than 24 hours. Therefore some of the garlic you eat should be raw. Finely chop raw garlic to make it more palatable, and eat it with other foods, such as salads.

Garlic-in-oil preparations can cause botulism if not prepared properly. When you make homemade garlic oils, refrigerate them and keep them no longer than 10-14 days. Commercial products are safe when they contain an acidifying agent, such as citric or phosphoric acid.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
All information provided in this site is the result of research using (but not limited to) the following books and guides: The Complete Guide to Natural Healing, International Masters Publishers.
This site makes every effort to provide accurate and up-to-date information that is intended to complement, not replace, the advice of your physician. Before undertaking the advice contained on this web site, you should consult with a health care professional, who can best assess your individual needs, symptoms and treatment.

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Chervil an Herb for Vitality

Chervil an Herb for Vitality

Chervil for tiredness.

Chervil for vitality, chervil for tiredness

Using Chervil for vitality is an excellent way of reawakening the spirits and decreasing tiredness. This herb will help to stimulate digestion and waste removal in a slow-acting and gentle nature. Therefore it is best to use it over a long period of time — every day for at least 2 months. Chop the leaves and scatter them over bread or hot, steamed vegetables. You can, if you wish, add them to your salads as well.

Most modern folk remedies use chervil tea as a spring and fall blood-purifying tonic because chervil stimulates the appetite, acts as a mild diuretic and is warming. The seventeenth-century herbalist Culpepper and the Roman scholar Pliny would agree with this modern application; they both suggest using chervil to “warm and please cold stomachs.” Chervile was used even more broadly in the Middle Ages, when this member of the Umbelliferae family became a mainstay for treating weakness that often comes with old age, memory loss, “women’s troubles” and the black plague.


Therapeutic Effect: Chervil stimulates circulation, purifies the blood and urine and will promote sweating. Digestive complaints can be reduced because of the essential oils found in chervil. Together with bitters, the oils have a positive effect on the gall bladder and will promote the secretion of gastric juices. Tea made from the leaves stimulates the kidney and metabolism.

Components

In addition to essential oils and bitters, chervil contains a great deal of vitamin C as well as provitamin A, very important nutrients for vision. However the body can make use of this only if supplied with fat at the same time. Chervil is also rich in minerals — chiefly iron, which is important for the production of blood, and calcium and magnesium, which are necessary for muscle and nerve function.


EXTRA TIP – If you want a supply of vitamins and minerals that lasts from May through December, you can easily grow chervil in a pot or balcony container. Remember that for the seed to germinate successfully it needs a temperature of below 59°F.


Chervil Kitchen Hints

Despite its long history as a medicinal herb, chervil shines best in the kitchen. Its slightly sweet flavor has a faint anise scent, making it ideal for adding depth to soups, sauces and potato and egg dishes.

Chervil tastes considerably better in the spring and summer months because the leaves are more tender and have a richer aroma than other months of the year when its fragrance fades.

The aroma of chervil is enjoyed and appreciated most when used in creamy sauces or spreads.

Scatter chervil over salads or cream soups as a savory addition, or use it to garnish your favorite dish, as you would parsley.

To preserve its flavor, never cook chervil along with the rest of the dish — always add it at the end of the cooking time. Otherwise, the fine aroma and its many valuable nutrients will be lost.

The herb tastes best when the stems are no longer that 4 in. Therefore, you should continually re-seed the herb when growing it in our own garden so that you can harvest young, tender shoots at any time.

Chervil slightly resembles the more common parsley but adds a finer flavor. You can substitute one for the other any tome one is unavailable. Mixed with other herbs, chervil enhances their flavor.

Chervil keeps poorly. It stores best when added to butter and kept cold or frozen. It does not dry very well.

Buy Chervil At Starwest Botanicals

Latin Name: Anthriscus cerefolium
Anthriscus cerefolium is the Latin botanical name of the plant that produces culinary chervil. We directly source this delicious herb from our supplier in France, and then we process our Chervil Leaf in house in order to verify that quality controls are in place.

French cooks have long used Chervil Spice when cooking soups, omelettes and salads, favoring its lightly anise-like flavor. It is one of the components of fines herbes, a French herb blend. It can be used in a number of recipes to season chicken, turkey, fish and vegetables, as well as soups, salad dressings and sauces. The herb can be used to spice up potato salad, risotto, and curried dishes. This flavoring can also be added to soft cheeses to impart its delicate and delicious taste. The flavor of meats can be improved with an herb and spice rub, and Chervil works well in this use.When you buy Chervil from Starwest, you can be assured that as a certified bulk dried herbs and spice processor with a commitment to bringing our customers value, Starwest Botanicals offers only the finest dried herbs at the best prices with outstanding customer service and a full satisfaction guarantee.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
All information provided in this site is the result of research using (but not limited to) the following books and guides: The Complete Guide to Natural Healing, International Masters Publishers.
This site makes every effort to provide accurate and up-to-date information that is intended to complement, not replace, the advice of your physician. Before undertaking the advice contained on this web site, you should consult with a health care professional, who can best assess your individual needs, symptoms and treatment.

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Oregano for Coughs

Oregano for Coughs

Oregano’s Healing Ability

oregano's healing ability oregano for coughs

Oregano (Origanum vulgare) – The name oregano refers to more than two dozen species of this sweetly scented spice, which is also known as wild or sweet marjoram. While the many varieties of oregano are said to subtly differ in flavor, they all contain essential oils with remarkable and similar healing abilities one of which is oregano for coughs. Oregano was first valued by ancient Egyptians, who used the perennial herb as both a preservative and an antidote to poison. In the eighteenth century, it was considered to be useful for oregano for coughs and asthma. Recent research confirms oregano’s use as an antibacterial and antifungal treatment for all manner of respiratory ailments. Oregano is also effective in stimulating the appetite and alleviating tooth pain.


Therapeutic Effect of Oregano:

Antispasmodic and choleretic, or bile stimulating, oregano is often prescribed for indigestion, flatulence and stomach pain and bloating. In addition, oregano acts as an expectorant, helping to clear congestion linked with coughs, bronchitis and asthma.

Components: The essential oil in most Orenano species contains the constituents carvacrol and thymol, both recognized for their ability to help slow the growth of bacteria, loosen phlegm, soothe the digestive tract and destroy most fungi and worms. The spice also contains tannins, flavonoids, resin and bitters, which are said to stimulate the appetite and aid digestion.


Buy Oregano Essential Oil

Herby, woody, yet slightly spicy, Oregano Essential Oil’s main effect seems to be on the digestive system, soothing the stomach and calming intestinal spasms. It may combat acidity, stomach gas, and encourage appetite. Perfect for diffusion, bath, steam inhalation, compress, and massage.

Scent Characteristics: Herby, woody, yet slightly spicy.

Warning: Keep out of reach of children. Highly concentrated, dilute properly before use. Keep away from eyes & mucous membranes. Not to be used during pregnancy or while nursing.


Kitchen Hints

The herb’s spicy, minty flavor makes it popular in the kitchen, too; it often appears on top of pizza and in pastas, soups and sauces.

Starwest Botanicals Carries Dried Oregano

Dried Oregano is a wonderful addition to so many dishes that you prepare for family and friends. Now you can find the finest dried Oregano at Starwest Botanicals, a certified bulk herbs processor committed to bringing you the quality Oregano Spice with exceptional customer service and fair prices.

Organic Oregano is likely one of the first ingredients that you would think of to put into a lovely tomato-based marinara sauce for use over pasta. A sprinkle of oregano on top of a green salad that contains robust cheese crumbled on top and olives makes the vegetables all come alive on the palate. Fresh ripe summer tomatoes, roasted eggplant rounds and mozzarella are beautiful sliced, then arranged on a platter and sprinkled with extra virgin olive oil, black pepper and some oregano. Beautiful new red or fingerling potatoes coated in olive oil and sprinkled with oregano, black pepper, salt and a little paprika, then put into the oven to roast, make a glorious side dish for your next chicken dinner. You can also consider adding some oregano to your chicken marinade for a pleasing poultry addition. Scrambled eggs or scrambled tofu can be easily livened up with the addition of a little oregano, cumin, and pepper as well as a tiny touch of turmeric, along with grated Colby Jack cheese near the end of the cooking time. This makes a wonderful organic oregano-seasoned filling for corn or flour tortillas, which can be served with guacamole, salsa and sour cream.Oregano Dried Spice from Starwest Botanicals comes in cut and sifted, powder, as well as organic and kosher forms for your convenience.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
All information provided in this site is the result of research using (but not limited to) the following books and guides: The Complete Guide to Natural Healing, International Masters Publishers.
This site makes every effort to provide accurate and up-to-date information that is intended to complement, not replace, the advice of your physician. Before undertaking the advice contained on this web site, you should consult with a health care professional, who can best assess your individual needs, symptoms and treatment.

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Parsley Tonic to Aid Circulation

Parsley Tonic to Aid Circulation

Parsley Tonic to Aid Circulation

Parsley Tonic to Aid CirculationMedieval German herbalist Saint Hildegard of Bingen prescribed parsley tonic wine to improve blood circulation. It was believed to help heart conditions.

How to make parsley tonic wine: Combine 10-12 large sprigs of parsley with 1 quart of red or white wine and 2 tbsp. of white-wine vinegar. Boil for 10 min., then add 9 oz. of honey. Strain the mixture and pour into bottles. Take 1 tbsp. three times a day.

Some interesting facts about Parsley (Petroselinum crispum)

Now grown all over the world, parsley originated in the Eastern Mediterranean region. For more than 2,000 years, it has been known as a medicinal herb. The ancient Greeks valued the seeds and roots of the plant for their soothing, diuretic effect on those with kidney and bladder ailments. Today, parsley is still used primarily as a diuretic. In addition, it strengthens the digestive system and helps alleviate stomach and liver problems.

In folk medicine, parsley is recommended for women who have irregular menstrual periods. As a diuretic, it may also ease the bloating that some women experience before their periods.

In addition, parsley leaves are a good source of many vitamins and minerals — including iron, which is important for the proper formation of red blood cells, potassium and vitamin C.


Parsley for Osteoporosis

To fight against osteoporosis, sometimes high doses of calcium are taken in supplement form. However this can impair the body’s absorption of manganese, which helps build bone. But parsley enhances manganese absorption, particularly when it is eaten with foods containing copper and zinc, such as shellfish and whole grains.


Extra Tip

Parsley contains essential oils; the most important one, apiole, is a kidney stimulant. Because these essential oils can stimulate uterine contractions, pregnant women should avoid eating large quantities of it. But, after the baby is born, parsley can help tone the uterus and promote lactation.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
All information provided in this site is the result of research using (but not limited to) the following books and guides: The Complete Guide to Natural Healing, International Masters Publishers.
This site makes every effort to provide accurate and up-to-date information that is intended to complement, not replace, the advice of your physician. Before undertaking the advice contained on this web site, you should consult with a health care professional, who can best assess your individual needs, symptoms and treatment.

Lovage for water retention

Lovage for water retention

Lovage as a dependable diuretic

lovage a dependable diureticKnown primarily as a gentle and dependable diuretic, lovage (Levisticum officinale) has been found especially useful in reducing water retention and swelling in the feet. The herb also ranks as a digestive aid, notably in its ability to relieve bloating, gas and the intestinal cramps that tend to accompany these conditions.

Although lovage may not spark romantic passion — the name has no traceable connection to the English word for the amorous emotion — the herb has much to recommend it for use in both cooking and healing. Using just a pinch of lovage, you can impart the sharp flavor of celery (a close relative) to stuffings, creamed soups, stews and even potato salads; its seeds work well in pickling brines and dressings. In its medicinal form, lovage has been prized since the Middle Ages for treating all manner of ailments as noted above.

Further, lovage adds an aromatic, vibrant touch to the harden, growing readily to offer you its practical gifts.


Lovage help for Indigestion

A tea blend featuring lovage seeds can relieve indigestion.

Here’s what you need. Mix 1 ½ oz. each of ground lovage seeds, angelica seeds and aniseed with ¾ oz. each of ground dandelion root and catnip. Pour 1 cup of boiling water over 2 tsp. of the blend. Steep for 10 min.; then strain. Drink 1 cup 15 min. before and after meals likely to cause upset.


Take Care!

Avoid lovage if you have bladder, kidney or pelvic inflammation disease. Also, large therapeutic doses may pose the risk of miscarriage in pregnant women.

Hard to find

Plan ahead. I have found the Lovage Herb leaf difficult to find as a dried form but did manage to find the lovage seeds on Amazon. If you have a garden or balcony you can easily grow your own.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
All information provided in this site is the result of research using (but not limited to) the following books and guides: The Complete Guide to Natural Healing, International Masters Publishers.
This site makes every effort to provide accurate and up-to-date information that is intended to complement, not replace, the advice of your physician. Before undertaking the advice contained on this web site, you should consult with a health care professional, who can best assess your individual needs, symptoms and treatment.

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Borage for Stress

Borage for Stress

Borage (Borago officinalis) prepares the body to handle stress

borage for stressPhysicians of the late Middle Ages recommended borage — an herb native to the eastern Mediterranean — for restoring life’s energy. They believed it supplied courage, confidence and cheerfulness. Now we know that borage stimulates the production of adrenaline, which prepares the body to handle stress; so in fact, the medieval belief was well founded. Other names for the blue-flowering herb, such as “good cheer,” “dear friend” and “sparkling eyes.” reflect borage’s ability to brighten the mood.  Rich in a polyunsaturated fatty acid, borage-seed oil is used to address metabolic problems from obesity to premenstrual complaints. Borage also promotes lactation, helps break a fever by inducing a sweat and breaks up phlegm while easing sore throats and coughs.


Borage and Echinacea Tea Helps for Viral Infections

A borage-and-echinacea tea has a calming effect, reduces fever and induces sweating. It helps the body combat measles, mumps, chicken pox, colds and flus. Mix equal amounts of borage leaves and powdered echinacea root. Brew it in hot water, steep for 10 minutes and sweeten with honey. Drink 1 cup 3 times per day.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
All information provided in this site is the result of research using (but not limited to) the following books and guides: The Complete Guide to Natural Healing, International Masters Publishers.
This site makes every effort to provide accurate and up-to-date information that is intended to complement, not replace, the advice of your physician. Before undertaking the advice contained on this web site, you should consult with a health care professional, who can best assess your individual needs, symptoms and treatment.

 

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